What is 5G? Everything you need to know about 5G

This article originally appeared on TechWorld by Christina Mercer.

With most phones running 3G and some on 4G, Techworld examines the next generation wireless system, 5G.

What is 5G?

While 5G isn’t expected until 2020, an increasing number of companies are investing now to prepare for the new mobile wireless standard. We explore 5G, how it works and its impact on future wireless systems. (See also: A timeline of UK 5G development).

5G simply stands for fifth generation and refers to the next and newest mobile wireless standard based on the IEEE 802.11ac standard of broadband technology, although a formal standard for 5G is yet to be set.

According to the Next Generation Mobile Network’s 5G white paper, 5G connections must be based on ‘user experience, system performance, enhanced services, business models and management & operations’.

And according to the Groupe Speciale Mobile Association (GSMA) to qualify for a 5G a connection should meet most of these eight criteria:

  1. One to 10Gbps connections to end points in the field
  2. One millisecond end-to-end round trip delay
  3. 1000x bandwidth per unit area
  4. 10 to 100x number of connected devices
  5. (Perception of) 99.999 percent availability
  6. (Perception of) 100 percent coverage
  7. 90 percent reduction in network energy usage
  8. Up to ten-year battery life for low power, machine-type devices

Previous generations like 3G were a breakthrough in communications. 3G receives a signal from the nearest phone tower and is used for phone calls, messaging and data.

4G works the same as 3G but with a faster internet connection and a lower latency (the time between cause and effect).

According to the Next Generation Mobile Network’s 5G white paper, 5G connections must be based on ‘user experience, system performance, enhanced services, business models and management & operations’.

And according to the Groupe Speciale Mobile Association (GSMA) to qualify for a 5G a connection should meet most of these eight criteria:

  1. One to 10Gbps connections to end points in the field
  2. One millisecond end-to-end round trip delay
  3. 1000x bandwidth per unit area
  4. 10 to 100x number of connected devices
  5. (Perception of) 99.999 percent availability
  6. (Perception of) 100 percent coverage
  7. 90 percent reduction in network energy usage
  8. Up to ten-year battery life for low power, machine-type devices

Previous generations like 3G were a breakthrough in communications. 3G receives a signal from the nearest phone tower and is used for phone calls, messaging and data.

4G works the same as 3G but with a faster internet connection and a lower latency (the time between cause and effect).

Disadvantages of 5G

However, 5G will cost more to implement and while the newest mobile phones will probably have it integrated, other handsets could be deemed out of date.

A reliable, wireless internet connection can depend on the number of devices connected to one channel. With the addition of 5G to the wireless spectrum, this could put us at risk of overcrowding the frequency range.

The problems with 4G and even 3G aren’t exactly filling us with the hope of an immediate super fast connection.

For a long time (and still even now) certain handsets and areas of the UK don’t support or can access 4G connections, so the rollout for 5G is likely to be very patchy.

The future of 5G

As 5G is still in development, it is not yet open for use by anyone. However, lots of companies have started creating 5G products and field testing them.

Notable advancements in 5G technologies have come from Nokia, Qualcomm, Samsung, Ericsson and BT, with growing numbers of companies forming 5G partnerships and pledging money to continue to research into 5G and its application.

Qualcomm and Samsung have focused their 5G efforts on hardware, with Qualcomm creating a 5G modem and Samsung producing a 5G enabled home router.

Both Nokia and Ericcson have created 5G platforms aimed at mobile carriers rather than consumers.  Ericsson created the first 5G platform earlier this year that claims to provide the first 5G radio system. Ericsson began 5G testing in 2015.

Who is investing in 5G?

Both Nokia and Ericcson have created 5G platforms aimed at mobile carriers rather than consumers.  Ericsson created the first 5G platform earlier last year that claims to provide the first 5G radio system, although it has begun 5G testing in 2015.

Similarly, in early 2017, Nokia launched “5G First”, a platform aiming to provide end-to-end 5G support for mobile carriers.

Looking closer to home, the City of London turned on its district-wide public Wi-Fi network in October 2017, consisting of 400 small cell transmitters. The City plans to run 5G trials on it.

Chancellor Philip Hammond revealed in the Budget 2017 that the government will pledge £16 million to create a 5G hub. However, given the rollout of 4G, it’s unknown what rate 5G will advance at.

Likewise, Newport in Wales is set to house a technology hub to support robotics, 5G and driverless cars. The

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